By | 05.08.2019

Review: Audio Review: PreSonus StudioLive 24.4.2 Digital Mixer

live interior 3d pro edition
Buy Software with Discount
Reviews In a footprint of less than 2 square feet, the compact channel StudioLive As with all StudioLive mixers, the And it’s so lightweight and compact that you can easily hold it in one hand and tuck it under your arm.
presonus digital

Presonus StudioLive 24.4.2AI Digital Mixer

I had already used one of PreSonus’ eight-channel compressors, and was impressed with the sound quality, value and real-world practicality of the products Odom was designing.

I went on to use and own several other PreSonus products, including mic preamps, digitally controlled graphic EQs and computer recording interfaces. In each case, PreSonus stayed true to its commitment to offer excellent sound quality and value. PreSonus has set its sites on bigger and bigger game over the years, even applying its quality-meets-value approach to the “pure” digital market of late. Odom’s little company is not so little anymore-the introduction of a pair of small-format digital mixers and a digital audio workstation DAW software package now has them competing with the likes of Yamaha, Tascam, Mackie, Roland, Apple, Avid and a whole host of other heavyweights.

As its name implies, the StudioLive Every input and output on the StudioLive is given royal treatment with the mixer’s Fat Channel processing section. Processing includes a phase switch, high-pass filter, noise gate, compressor, four-band EQ, and limiter. The Fat Channel doesn’t just offer stripped-down controls; every processing section offers all the standard parameters you’d expect.

You can also copy Fat Channel settings between mixer channels, which is a very handy feature. One of the mixer’s best features is its 32×26 Firewire interface, which makes the StudioLive the most powerful live recording system available at this price point. Attach a Mac or PC computer, install the included Capture application, and you’re ready to record.

StudioLive gives you control over whether individual channels go to the Firewire interface before or after Fat Channel processing, so you can record with or without EQ and dynamics. For mix down through the StudioLive, individual channels can be set to process the return from the Firewire interface instead of the analog input. Because the Firewire interface is always working bi-directionally, you can also use the Fat Channels as outboard processing for your DAW.

In Use Some digital mixers scare new users, and rightfully so-they’re scary. With mile-deep control menus and buttons everywhere, their learning curves can be steep.

StudioLive’s interface is refreshingly simple in comparison. Most parameter changes happen in the middle of the board, using the same set of knobs and buttons for any selected input or output. Selecting an input or output channel brings up the corresponding Fat Channel parameters. Press “Mix” on an aux send, and send levels are mapped one-to-one to the channel control knobs. In graphic EQ mode, the middle knobs control individual bands.

Setting up a mix with the StudioLive is simple: Make Fat Channel adjustments to filtering, EQ or dynamics if desired. Select an aux output’s “Mix” button and increase the channel’s control knob to the desired level. Do the same for the built-in effects send level if desired. If you want to route the input to a subgroup instead of the main output, select the subgroup at the bottom of the Fat Channel control area.

To link adjacent odd-even channels in stereo inputs or subgroups , click the “Link” button. Once the bits are flowing, the StudioLive backs up its features with excellent sound quality. There’s no weak link that I could hear: Stated audio specs are flawless, with direct analog outputs delivering 40 kHz bandwidth and all other processing limited only by sample rate. StudioLive feels sturdy and well-built, and PreSonus stands behind the Chinese-made mixer with a one-year warranty. Controls are responsive, and the mixer quickly makes you feel at home using it.

In short, mixing on the StudioLive is a pleasant experience. The quality of built-in effects is fine, but their variety and controllable parameters are quite limited. Reverbs and delays are all you get, with up to six editable parameters available for delays and just three or fewer for reverbs. Thankfully, the effects pass through a Fat Channel for some additional tone-shaping control.

I would expect PreSonus to expand the range of on-board effects and parameters in the future. A big part of the answer came when I realized that the StudioLive’s faders are not motorized. This omission saves money in manufacturing, and actually turned out to be less of a liability than I initially expected it to be. Put simply, the StudioLive is designed to be a digital mixer-not an automated mixer.

The mixer offers scene recall, but no way to externally trigger that recall. Nor does it have a MIDI input for real-time automated control.

When you recall a scene, a “locate” mode makes it relatively painless to return the faders to their saved locations. Restore analog knobs to their rightful places log sheets provided , and you’re good to go.

At this price point, the StudioLive will likely be replacing analog mixers in applications where true automation is not really necessary. It’s worth noting that remote control of most parameters is possible with the included Virtual StudioLive software running on an attached computer. Add it all up, and the mixing, recording and processing power of the StudioLive package is hard to top.

That said, StudioLive won’t do everything. It won’t do high sample rate recording, won’t do automation, won’t output a test tone or pink noise, and it won’t pad a too-hot mic or line input. Unlike some of its competition that allows “anything to anywhere” patching, StudioLive offers no internal routing matrix. It won’t put EQ before compression.

In the majority of applications, these items won’t be deal-breakers. If your house of worship requires a capable, well-conceived digital mixer that benefits from a great software bundle and unmatched live recording capabilities, the StudioLive

STUDIOLIVE1602U

I had already used one of PreSonus’ eight-channel compressors, and was impressed with the sound quality, value and real-world practicality of the products Odom was designing. I went on to use and own several other PreSonus products, including mic preamps, digitally controlled graphic EQs and computer recording interfaces. In each case, PreSonus stayed true to its commitment to offer excellent sound quality and value. PreSonus has set its sites on bigger and bigger game over the years, even applying its quality-meets-value approach to the “pure” digital market of late. Odom’s little company is not so little anymore-the introduction of a pair of small-format digital mixers and a digital audio workstation DAW software package now has them competing with the likes of Yamaha, Tascam, Mackie, Roland, Apple, Avid and a whole host of other heavyweights. As its name implies, the StudioLive

VIDEO: PreSonus StudioLive USB Channel Digital Mixer – Long & McQuade Musical Instruments

Our first-generation StudioLive™ and changed the game, offering amazing performance and ease of use for a great price. So we packed the same . There is a newer model of this item: Presonus StudioLive USB16x2 Performance and Recording Digital Mixer (SL USB) $ (6) In Stock. When PreSonus first launched its line of StudioLive mixing consoles, the intent was to combine a feature-packed digital mixer with a multitrack.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *